REvolution continued, final (maybe)

I’ve been walking around my house for days now assessing each item’s value and it’s potential to help in our survival for when the power goes out. I’m also wondering at what point did people understand that the power was out and wasn’t coming back on? During the summer when we had the storm that knocked the power out for a week, people were annoyed, but there wasn’t panic because we all understood the power was going back on at some point.

So in Revolution whent the power went out, how long did people stay in their home, complacent and believing the power company would set everything to rights soon? I live a few miles from the White House and major news studios. On what day following a blackout of power and all communications would we hike down to see if the President had any information or messages of leadership?

At what point would my husband and I say time to abandon ship? Where would we go, and what would we bring? Things I think I’d bring:

1. all jewelery with real jewels gold or pearls. Paper money is worthless, at some point this will have bartering value

2. my cast iron skillet- it can cook over an open flame and could be a makeshift weapon if necessary

3. kitchen knives

4. Shoes, 2 pairs serious winter boots & my Keens. Winter/Summer both durable

5. every leftover prescription of antibiotics and pain killers- that last episode made me think of this. Tetanus is a HUGE problem. After Hurricane Andrew, there were rusty nails everywhere from homes being blown apart. In addition to the numerous flat tires, loads of people stepped on the nails and needed Tetanus shots, but hospitals ran out. They’d never had such a demand. Same thing would happen when the power goes out.

6. A crap ton of condoms. The last thing I need while trying to survive without power is to be pregnant. Not to mention, both my kids were C-sections since my body never went into labor.  It would be dangerous to try to give birth naturally for me.

7. A book. I agonized over which one book, and finally I settled on my Tanach- that’s a Hebrew Acronym for a book that has the whole bible Plus more. And it’s in English & Hebrew. It’s got romance, suspense, intrigue, and the word of G-d. But man would I miss my Kresley Cole.

8. Tools- hammer, saw, nails, string- lots and lots of string, scissors,

9. Sewing kit, yarn, crochet hooks

10.  pencils

11. Some food- but I don’t have enough canned goods to last for more than a week

12. Sleeping bags

There’s probably more to bring, but that’s at the top of my list. What’s at the top of yours?

9 thoughts on “REvolution continued, final (maybe)

  1. Canned goods are way too heavy. (Ever read A Walk in The Woods?) You’re best to order Scout meals from Philmont, New Mexico. They’re prepackaged dried goods, relatively light-weight, and heavy on calories for strenuous activity.

  2. Lynne Silver says:

    Lorrie, That’s a great point. Cans are heavy! I need MRES. BUt it will be too late to order the meals when the power goes out. I’m simply going to have to learn to hunt & identifiy edible bushes.

  3. My house has a gear room, so I’m at an unfair advantage! (I’m married to an adventure guy.)

  4. DH and I are preppers, so I spend a lot of time thinking about this and preparing for a long-term grid-down situation.

    We have enough food to feed our family for almost a year, (long-term storage food, dehydrated food, etc) plus water, plus a heavy-duty water filter, Propane oven, coal grill, lanterns, flashlights and batteries, tons of antibiotics and meds, medical supplies, a solar-powered hot-water shower, extra TP and paper towels etc, guns, ammo, and a bow and arrows to hunt for food and to protect our stuff.

    Sound crazy? Maybe. But when I learned about EMPs, I got serious about preparation, and I even wrote a book about it (The Pulse Trilogy, coming out later next year from Simon & Schuster).

    My advice is make sure you have a way to sanitize drinking water, and to have a plan for that first. Then start getting long-term food storage. We use Emergency Essentials and Costco a lot. Good luck with your preparations!

    Speaking of learning about edible plants, the Army has a field guide of poisonous and edible plants. If you buy survival skill-oriented print books ahead of time, you’ll be ready for when you can’t Google whether or not the berry you just picked will kill you or save your life!

  5. Lynne Silver says:

    Shoshanna, you have me panicking at how unprepared I am. I’m going to get that Army guide. Part of me wants to be prepared & the other part realizes I live 2 miles from the White House. When shit goes down, I’m going with it.

  6. Carlene says:

    Lynne, first off can I come live with you in this event? I think cracking up laughing is also a valuable asset and I know you’d have me rolling. In all seriousness, I have an uncle who goes “canning” and I don’t mean jams and veggies. He cans things like, hmm, I probably shouldn’t say and then buries them where looters wouldn’t be able to get to them. Sometimes I worry about him but hands down, that’s the guy I’m gonna beg to let me in his hideout!

  7. Just because you live near the White House doesn’t mean you’ll automatically die, it means you should be extra-prepared for the very real possibility of an attack.

    After 9-11, back before I became a prepper and before I had a family, I immediately took to the woods and camped out for 2 whole weeks, checking in with the radio, because I was positive we were about to be attacked all over the US and bombs would drop and I wanted to be where I had a chance of surviving. So even when I was 21 I went into survival-mode when TSHTF!

  8. Abbi Wilder says:

    This is great information but it’s scaring the sh** out of me. I’m so not prepared. Thinking of ways to sanitize water without power . . .

    Carlene’s right, too. Laughter is the best medicine.

    And, man, Lynne, I thought you had some cool use for condoms. Can they be used to sanitize water?

    Abbi

  9. Carlene says:

    By far my favorite conversation of the night 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *